Joints

Causes 

Pain in the joints is most often as a result of an injury, wear and tear or arthritis. It may also occur as a result of a viral infection, connective tissue disease, cancer or a lack of blood supply or blood vessel inflammation. A person may be more susceptible to joint problems if their immune system is compromised. Food allergies and the use of certain types of medication can also be contributing factors in arthritis. (https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/joint-pain/) (https://bioresonance.com/bioresonance-therapy-rheumatic-disorders-2/

Symptoms 

Joint problems can affect people of any age but are more common as a person gets older and may simply occur after overuse of a particular joint. They may cause pain in just one joint or in several. Injuries affecting the joint will likely cause localised pain and inflammation. If there has been bleeding into the joint space, there may also be stiffness, bruising and warmth in the joint. It may be particularly painful to walk up or down the stairs if the cartilage at the back of the knee is damaged. Arthritis leads to joint stiffness and attacks of pain and the skin may be reddened and hot. Some people will feel generally ill.  
 

Bicom Programs to be Used 

Joints Min N°/Seq. Pag  
Ankle problems acute 600.1 14 
Bl – Bladder chronic 
Gb – Gallbladder chronic 
Knee joint diseases 

4  
4+5 
391.1 
371.1  
502.4 
90 
90  
45 
Hip joint restricted movement 
Li – Large intestine chronic 
Hip joint block/intestine 
Hip joint block/large intestine 
5  
4  
4+6  
620.0  
221.1  
532.3  
550.2 
36  
89  
36  
36 
Lu – Lungs chronic 
Si – Small intestine chronic 
St – Stomach chronic 
Cervical, St related 

4  

211.1 
291.1  
331.1 
970.8 
89 
89  
90 
23 
Ki – Kidney chronic 
He – Heart chronic 
Li – Liver chronic 
Sp – Spleen pancreas chronic 



381.1 
281.1 
311.1 
301.1 
90 
89 
90 
90 

Supplements to take 

Vitamin B complex, vitamin C, vitamin E (https://www.wddty.com/magazine/2017/september/healed-from-head-to-toe-1.html)  

Other therapies 

Temporary joint pain and inflammation triggered by an injury can be helped by resting and using an ice pack to cool the area or anti-inflammatory medication to reduce swelling. Various types of medication can be used to help arthritis or to at least ease symptoms and slow the progression of the disease. Some joint problems may be eased through physiotherapy. It is vital to keep well hydrated, consuming about 2 litres of water each day and limiting alcohol consumption. Following a healthy diet that does not contain too many acidic foods may also help improve the condition. Avoiding any trigger foods and trying to tackle allergies will also help. Lifestyle changes may include taking measures to reduce levels of stress and establishing a better sleep pattern.  

Experiences and case studies 

A 40-year-old secretary was struggling with psoriatic arthritis which caused pain and deformities in her fingers and made it difficult for her to work or even walk. She was treated for allergies and rheumatism and the treatment was carried out weekly for about 6 months. Now, the deformities have significantly improved and she no longer has any symptoms. She can walk and has been able to continue her secretarial work and is even able to knit again. (https://bioresonance.com/rheumatism-and-osteochondrosis/)  

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