Multiple Sclerosis

Causes 

Multiple sclerosis is an inflammatory autoimmune disease where the immune system destroys the myelin sheath, which is a protective tissue around the nerves in the central nervous system, compromising nerve function. When antigens have a similar structure to healthy proteins in the body, the immune system can trigger a response against the invading proteins as well as the healthy proteins with a similar amino acid chain. Given the geography of where sufferers tend to be located, it is reasonable to conclude that vitamin D deficiency may contribute towards this condition. Chronic dehydration, insufficient exercise and fungal infestation may also be involved. There may be some kind of trauma involved or damage to the gut lining, allowing foreign proteins to pass through the permeable intestinal lining into the bloodstream. Some people may be more likely to develop this disease because of their genetics or stress from allergies, heavy metals or a viral infection.  

Symptoms 

The condition mainly affects young or middle-aged adults and is more common in women. Signs of the condition include: fatigue; problems with coordination, perhaps appearing drunk; pain in the eyes or blurry vision; tingling, numbness or being physically weak; constipation or urinary incontinence. People with this condition may also struggle with involuntary movements of the eyes and limbs as well as speech problems. Symptoms often appear in the form of attacks, before settling again.  

BICOM® Programs to be Used 

Multiple Sclerosis Min N°/Seq. Pag  
Large intestine, problem 
Intestinal/lumbar spine 
Mucosal regulation 
Bowel action, regulate 
5  
24  
12 
27  
3028.0   
PS 10037, PS 10036 
3089.0  
PS 10040  
47  
44  
53 
20  
Inflammations 
Nerve problem, calming  
17 
3+4  
3037.0 
911.1, 423.5  
42 
55  
Nerve function, to regulate 
12 
3074.0 
3075.0 
66 
66 
Metabolism therapy 
Metabolism treatment, acute 
Metabolism treatment, chronic 
10 
3  
3  
530.4 
260.2  
261.3  
52 
52  
52  
Metabolic disorders 9+ 
10 
3106.0 
3107.0 
51 
51 

(https://bioresonance.com/multiple-sclerosis-does-this-diagnosis-have-to-spell-doom/)

Supplements to take 

Vitamin D, iodine, vitamin C, vitamin B complex, niacin, vitamin A & E, magnesium, selenium, zinc, flaxseed oil  

Other therapies 

Doctors often treat this condition with immune-suppressing drugs to limit the symptoms created by the immune system attacking the tissues. Anti-fungal drugs may prove effective in helping to combat an underlying infestation. A plant-based diet that is rich in antioxidants needs to be implemented and should include beneficial fats such as coconut oil. Artificial sweeteners such as aspartame and refined sugars and grains are to be avoided. Quitting smoking is also an important step. The body needs to be hydrated with plenty of water, rather than caffeinated beverages. Regular, vigorous exercise is crucial, though those with severe forms of the condition may need to use more gentle forms of exercise. Getting proper sleep is vital and stress needs to be kept to a minimum. (https://bioresonance.com/ms-and-bioresonance-therapy/)  

Experiences and case studies 

Antje, a 31-year-old woman, had been working very long hours and putting herself under pressure when she was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. Movement was impaired on both sides of her body at first. Within a few days she was also struggling with incontinence, headaches and difficulties talking, eating and swallowing. After a week in hospital and subsequent treatment with cortisone and Betaferon injections, she decided to try bioresonance. After around 20 bioresonance treatment sessions and some lifestyle changes, Antje was able to stop taking medication and has not had any more phases. (https://bioresonance.com/multiple-sclerosis-drug-free-a-possibility-with-bioresonance/)  

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